What caused the women’s suffrage movement in New Zealand?

New Zealand’s pioneering suffragists were inspired both by the equal-rights arguments of philosopher John Stuart Mill and British feminists and by the missionary efforts of the American-based Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).

What was the main cause of the women’s rights movement?

In the early 1800s many activists who believed in abolishing slavery decided to support women’s suffrage as well. A growing push for women’s rights, including suffrage, emerged from the political activism of such figures as Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone, Susan B. …

When did the women’s suffrage movement start NZ?

In the late 19th century women suffragists fought for the right to vote, and on 19 September 1893 a new Electoral Act was passed into law. New Zealand became the first self-governing country in the world in which all women had the right to vote in parliamentary elections.

What kick started the women’s suffrage movement?

In 1848, Canton presented the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention which took place in upstate New York. This convention kicked off the women’s rights movement. Several activists were present including social reformer Lucretia Mott and Frederick Douglass escaped slave and abolitionist.

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What were the main arguments for and against women’s suffrage?

Women voters, they said, would bring their moral superiority and domestic expertise to issues of public concern. Anti-suffragists argued that the vote directly threatened domestic life. They believed that women could more effectively promote change outside of the corrupt voting booth.

Who led the NZ suffrage movement?

On 19 September 1893 New Zealand became the first self-governing country to enfranchise women or give women the right to vote. Voting rights for women or women’s suffrage began in the late 19th century. Kate Sheppard was the most prominent leader of the suffragist movement in New Zealand.

Who started the women’s suffrage movement in NZ?

That achievement was the result of years of effort by suffrage campaigners, led by Kate Sheppard. In 1891, 1892 and 1893 they compiled a series of massive petitions calling on Parliament to grant the vote to women. In recent years Sheppard’s contribution to New Zealand’s history has been acknowledged on the $10 note.

How did the women’s suffrage movement affect history?

Women’s suffrage has had a profound impact on the USA. … The prohibition movement has been called “the first mass women’s movement in US history” and prohibition was spurred by women getting the vote in many states before the national amendment took effect in 1920. And women backed prohibition more strongly than men.

What events led up to the women’s suffrage movement?

The women’s rights movement splits as a result of disagreements over the 14th and 15th Amendments. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony form the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, and Julia Ward Howe organize the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA).

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When did the feminist movement start?

The wave formally began at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 when three hundred men and women rallied to the cause of equality for women. Elizabeth Cady Stanton (d. 1902) drafted the Seneca Falls Declaration outlining the new movement’s ideology and political strategies.

Why did men oppose the women’s suffrage movement?

The men and women who opposed woman’s suffrage did so for many reasons. Many believed that men and women were fundamentally different and that women should not sully themselves in the dirty world of politics. … Others also acted out of self-interest when working against woman’s suffrage.

Who was against the women’s suffrage movement?

One of the most important anti-suffragist activists was Josephine Jewell Dodge, a founder and president of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage. She came from a wealthy and influential New England family; her father, Marshall Jewell, served as a governor of Connecticut and U.S. postmaster general.